Elephant of the Week or Elephants to Adopt / Foster / Sponsor

MALIMA : Elephant of the Week at The David Sheldrick Wildlife Trust : Too Cute

Name: MALIMA

Name Origin/Meaning: This baby elephant was found on a mound of earth. Malima means mound in Swahili.

Date of Birth: 18 May 2016, a Wednesday

Age When Rescued: five months

Gender: Female

Where Now: The David Sheldrick Wildlife Trust  Nursery   Nairobi Kenya Africa

Foster This Sweet Elephant

Too Cute For Photos see Malima’s photo gallery here

 

Location of Rescue: “In front of Aruba Lodge.” see area on Fostering map

Elephant Became Orphaned Because of: “Drought-Related

Situation Surrounding Orphaned Elephant’s Discovery: Devastating droughts in the area at that time left little to no food “anywhere close to water” to provide “life sustaining browse”. And because of the situation an elephant herd was forced to leave a sickly elephant behind.

If a miracle was possible this baby elephant was the recipient of one as she was most certainly surrounded by an elephant angel.

For in the early morning of 30 October 2016, when Malima was discovered (by a “Tsavo East National Park Assistant Warden”) a pride of lions were sighted feeding on an Oryx nearby. In all actuality the weakened calf, lying on her side on a mound of dirt, “emaciated” from the drought, should have been their prey.

Insights into Orphan’s Elephant Herd: Malima had most likely been left the previous night or the very morning of her rescue. In order to survive, a “heartbreaking decision” was made by Malima’s mama and elephant family to carry on in search of food and water while leaving the weakened calf behind (She would have been unable to keep up or walk very far). Sadly, this is not an unusual occurrence for elephants traveling far across the savanna.

Condition of Orphaned Elephant When Rescued: “She looked in a desperate state, totally unresponsive and seemingly just moments away from dying.” “To begin with the calf hardly stirred, but slowly she came to life and then hope was restored.”

Lifesaving Measures Taken: “On the scene, she was cooled down and shaded from the unforgiving sun whilst a lifesaving IV drip” was administered. “IV fluids” sustained Malima throughout the 90 minute flight. Rescuers were immediately encouraging the elephant calf to drink water through her mouth, which she did.

Transported Via: Landcruiser, “Rescue Plane from Nairobi”

 

drawing-of-baby-elephant-use-for-pd-picture-baby-has-heart-on-her-trunk

Credit: public domain, Baby Elephant Drawing

 

For Complete Story see Malima’s Orphan Profile:

Upon Arrival at the DSWT Nursery: The baby elephant had summoned the strength to stand on her feet pretty quickly. But afterward she was unable to calm down, draining what little energy she had left. Malima was quite anxious in her new surroundings which caused a second relapse despite DSWT Keepers patiently attending to her every need. (She was bottle-fed her milk and administered “rehydration salts”.) A second round of “IV fluids restored her life”.

What Makes This Sweet Elephant Unique: To this day little Malima has survived against all odds.

Baby Elephant’s Personality Traits: Malima is now a “bouncy member” of her new elephant family.

 

Her Keeper’s Diary includes updates on Malima and her other sweet elephant friends

Watch YouTube Video: Baby Malima is Rescued

More Updates on Malima

Credit: public domain drawing of baby elephant

 

To learn more about The David Sheldrick Wildlife Trust’s ( DSWT ) Fostering Program and how to Adopt Malima click here  then “select an orphan” MALIMA

Note: At The David Sheldrick Wildlife Trust  you may “foster your orphan”  from 1 year to up to 10 years! (You find this information after you have selected your elephant and then hit the Foster button. ) And before you submit your donation you “may select a few more orphans to foster” at the same time (for those of us who cannot decide!)

The orphaned elephants at The David Sheldrick Wildlife Trust are “reliant on your kind support”  and, as always, the future of our elephants is in our hands.

 

David Sheldrick Wildlife Trust on Facebook @thedsw

David Sheldrick Wildlife Trust on Twitter @DSWT

David Sheldrick Wildlife Trust on Instagram

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